Peter Morgan-Jones

Inspired blog of food book author and leading aged Care chef working for HammondCare

Australia’s most hipster suburbs less so for the poor

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Sydney inner west suburb Camperdown has been named among Australia’s most hipster suburbs, according to an article in Domain.

I know Camperdown exceedingly well and spend time with people who are invisble to hipster wealth and ideals.

Domain refers to Wikipedia for a definition of hipster:

“[Hipsters are] broadly associated with indie and alternative music, a varied non-mainstream fashion sensibility (including vintage and thrift store-bought clothes), generally progressive political views, organic and artisanal foods, and alternative lifestyles.”

And as a result these suburbs of hip young adults are:

According to Urbis’s Hip List, a hip suburb is at the “leading edge of cosmopolitan trends”, and offers an “unusually rich source of information on future consumer directions”.

In the middle of Camperdown’s hipsterness are a couple of buildings set aside for those who must have missed the hipster memo. Or maybe they are where hipster goes when life falls off (the…

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Media Release for Book Launch In Brighton UK at Metropole Hilton on 11th November 2014

By Peter Morgan-Jones, Emily Colombage,
Danielle McIntosh, Prudence Ellis
Published by HammondCare Media, July 1
Available in UK through http://www.careinfo.org/books/

‘I can’t tell you how proud I am to be asked to write the foreword for this truly exciting, important book. Reading through I was blown away by the practical knowledge shared in such a readable way.’ Maggie Beer, Australian food icon
________________________________________________

A Welsh chef with Royal experience will return to the UK next month to speak about his experience in revolutionising aged care food in Australia and beyond.

Peter Morgan-Jones is one of the authors of Don’t give me eggs that bounce: 118 cracking recipes for people with Alzheimer’s, a revolutionary cookbook designed to restore pleasure and dignity to the dining experience for people living with dementia.

Peter is widely regarded as Australia’s leading aged care chef and has made numerous media appearances as well as speaking at conferences attended by thousands.

After a stellar career is some of Sydney’s leading restaurants, Peter chose to use his passion for fresh produce and great food in helping others, becoming the inaugural executive chef and food ambassador for leading Australia health and aged care provider, HammondCare.

Before leaving the UK, career highlights included cooking for the Royal Family at Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle and heading up catering at Wimbledon. But his flare for food started much earlier than that.

Peter was born in Wales and first developed a love of cooking as a boy in his aunt’s kitchen.

“My mum didn’t have much time to cook, being busy working after my father died. But my aunt was a fantastic cook. She did all the cooking for us and I started helping in the kitchen from about the age of six,” Peter said.

The family had a garden brimming with rhubarb, gooseberries, pears and more and he was soon entering award-winning pies in local competitions.

A number of recipes in Don’t give me eggs that bounce are inspired by Peter’s childhood in Wales and his time spent cooking for the Royal Family, including a recipe for cottage pie Peter says was inspired by an ‘old recipe he used to cook for a young prince in Highgrove House’.

Peter Morgan-Jones will be participating in the UK Dementia Congress, November 10-12, at Hilton Brighton Metropole. For interviews or review copies email phallett@hammond.com.au or call ?? For information about the congress call ??
More about the book

Successful mealtimes
Easy to read chapters provide advice on nutrition for older people, successful mealtimes for people with dementia, understanding swallowing difficulties and how to prepare and present appetising and nutritious meals, including texture-modified food and drinks.

The delicious recipes cover all the main meals of the day, as well as dessert, beverages and mid meals which are especially important for older people and those living with dementia who often cannot eat a larger meal.

Australia’s leading aged care chef, Peter Morgan-Jones, has prepared more than 118 innovative recipes which draw on his extensive international experience. Many of the dishes have been shared in his daily work in HammondCare’s dementia cottages, much to the delight of residents and families.

He is ably supported by HammondCare experts – dietitian Emily Colombage, dementia consultant Danielle McIntosh and speech pathologist Prudence Ellis who join Peter in writing about how to make mealtimes a pleasurable, social and safe experience in the context of dementia, ageing, swallowing difficulties and texture-modified diets.

Care support
Carers are especially supported with time saving techniques, easy options and a special chapter on caring for the carer, along with lists of support organisations and resources.

Don’t give me eggs that bounce: 118 cracking recipes for people with Alzheimer’s is a beautifully styled and photographed cookbook that will be invaluable for anyone cooking for people with dementia and eating difficulties, and indeed anyone who likes good food.

What the Australian media have been saying…
Australian Woman’s Weekly: ‘a great resource for anyone seeking information on late-life nutrition. It’s beautifully photographed and includes stimulating recipes.’

The Australian: ‘It’s not often that you find a cookbook that can change lives. This one will… It’s a meticulous work of compassion and craft, with recipes tailored to the needs of the recipients of the meals and the carers. Most important, the book recognises that whatever our age and mental condition, we all want our food to be full of flavour.’

Australian Ageing Agenda: ‘From bacon dust and “everlasting” ice cream that doesn’t melt, to fruit juice foam and fresh raspberry juice air, HammondCare’s executive chef and food ambassador Peter Morgan-Jones is redefining what is possible for residents on a modified diet.’

Kelli Brett, Australian Broadcasting Corporation: ‘This book is not just for professionals it’s also for anyone that wants to support and nourish and care for a loved one as they age. The meals are cleverly designed to inspire carers to think about ways to improve the look of texture-modified food.

Our first Dining by design School starts in two weeks in Melbourne

Our first cooking school to share innovation in food delivery and service in aged care starts on 22nd September in Melbourne

very exciting !!

 

http://www.dementiacentre.com.au/education/study-days/dining-by-design

 

 

Don’t give me eggs that bounce Press release

0126_HC Cook Book 2013 Bircher Muesli

Don’t give me eggs that bounce
118 cracking recipes for people with Alzheimer’s

By Peter Morgan-Jones, Emily Colombage,
Danielle McIntosh, Prudence Ellis
Published by HammondCare Media, July 1 2014 RRP $39.95

‘I can’t tell you how proud I am to be asked to write the foreword for this truly exciting, important book. Reading through I was blown away by the practical knowledge shared in such a readable way.’ Maggie Beer

‘Here’s an important resource that ensures that as we age we can still enjoy the table and all that it brings to enriching our lives.’ Simon Bryant, Chef

Don’t give me eggs that bounce: 118 cracking recipes for people with Alzheimer’s is a groundbreaking cookbook that celebrates the dignity of older people, people with dementia and those with eating difficulties by offering nutritious, delicious food across a range of dietary needs. All of the recipes have been carefully analysed and tested and are clinically appropriate.

Easy to read chapters provide advice on nutrition for older people, successful mealtimes for people with dementia, understanding swallowing difficulties and how to prepare and present appetising and nutritious meals, including texture-modified food and drinks.

The delicious recipes cover all the main meals of the day, as well as dessert, beverages and mid meals which are especially important for older people and those living with dementia who often cannot eat a larger meal.

Australia’s leading aged care chef, Peter Morgan-Jones, has prepared innovative recipes which draw on his extensive international experience, with one recipe even inspired by cooking for a ‘young prince’ at Highgrove House. Many of the dishes have been shared in his daily work in HammondCare’s dementia cottages, much to the delight of residents and families.

He is ably supported by HammondCare experts – dietitian Emily Colombage, dementia consultant Danielle McIntosh and speech pathologist Prudence Ellis who join Peter in writing about how to make mealtimes a pleasurable, social and safe experience in the context of dementia, ageing, swallowing difficulties and texture-modified diets.

Carers are especially supported with time saving techniques, easy options and a special chapter on caring for the carer, along with lists of support organisations and resources.

When HammondCare’s Chief Executive, Dr Stephen Judd, wrote about eggs served to some older people as being more like ‘kiln-fired organic pottery’ than real eggs, he sparked a conversation that has led all the way to this book, and beyond.

Don’t give me eggs that bounce: 118 cracking recipes for people with Alzheimer’s is a beautifully styled and photographed cookbook that will be invaluable for anyone cooking for people with dementia and eating difficulties, and indeed anyone who likes good food.

About the authors:

Peter Morgan-Jones has cooked for the British Royal Family and alongside some of Australia’s best-known chefs and is now HammondCare’s Executive Chef and Food Ambassador. Peter began work with HammondCare in 2012, after five years as Head Chef at the Art Gallery of NSW. Other culinary highlights for Peter include working in some of Sydney’s most iconic restaurants including Gay Bilson’s Bennelong at the Opera House, the three-hat MG Garage with Janni Kyritsis and his own one-hat Clock Hotel Restaurant. Now Peter has embraced the opportunity to serve the aged care sector with his love of ‘unadulterated’ food through fresh, seasonal and sustainable produce and innovation in modified meals.

Danielle McIntosh is a Senior Dementia Consultant with The Dementia Centre, HammondCare, which offers impartial research and advice based on international best practice. Danielle is an occupational therapist and has considerable experience working with adults with cognitive and neurological disorders. For the past nine years Danielle has been involved in caring for people with dementia at home and in residential care, dementia-suitable design, and behavioural needs support and care planning.
Emily Colombage is an Accredited Practicing Dietitian working in residential aged care at HammondCare. Her major interests are dementia and nutrition, menu design and support and education of staff and carers. Emily has provided food and nutrition training for carers of people living with dementia at home. She is committed to improving the lives of people living with dementia through food and raising awareness about malnutrition in the ageing population.
Prudence Ellis is a Certified Practising Speech Pathologist and works full-time with adults with acquired speech, language and swallowing disorders. She works at HammondCare’s Braeside Hospital and privately with people living in aged care homes and the community. Her areas of expertise are rehabilitation, aged care, palliative care, with a special interest in people with dementia. Prudence is passionate about improving the quality of life for people with dementia and swallowing difficulties.

TO ARRANGE AN INTERVIEW WITH ANY OF THE AUTHORS, PLEASE CALL
LAURA RAE AT DMCPRMEDIA, T: 02 9550 9207 E: laura@dmcpr.com.au

Barossa Farm Chicken Bang Bang

Barossa Farm chicken Bang Bang
Serves 10
Ingredients
1.6 kg chicken breast skin on
20 g ginger
1 garlic cloves
2g chilli flakes
6 spring onions (shallots) each
2 carrots
1 telegraph cucumbers
2 tbsp rice wine vinegar
1 tbsp sugar
1 tsp salt
Garnish
6 tsp sesame seeds
1 bch coriander
100g toasted peanuts
25 g deep fried shallots
Sauce
6 tbsp peanut butter smooth
3 tsp sesame oil
6 tbsp light soy sauce
30 ml rice vinegar
1 tsp sugar
6 tbsp sweet chilli sauce
6 tbsp vegetable oil

Method
Place the chicken in a saucepan, add the ginger and cover with cold water. Bring to the boil, and then simmer gently for 10 minutes. Turn off the heat and leave to steep for another 20 minutes.
Toss the cucumber, celery and carrot with the rice vinegar, sugar and salt and set aside for an hour or two. Pour boiling water over the noodles, leave for 4 minutes, then drain.
To make the sauce, combine the peanut butter, sesame oil, soy sauce, rice vinegar, sweet chilli sauce, sugar and peanut oil in a bowl, whisking well until the sugar dissolves. Add a dash of water to lighten to pouring consistency.
Drain the chicken and finely slice across the grain, discarding skin (strain the stock for future use). Toss the noodles with the lightly pickled vegetables then divide between 10 plates. Arrange the chicken on top and spoon the peanut sauce on and around. Scatter with sesame seeds, coriander, fried shallots, cashew and serve with chopsticks

Tasting Australia

 preparing  food at Tasting Australia.

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I arrived at the event on the Sunday feeling quite intimidated by seeing the large celebrity kitchen stage with huge screens and TV cameras.

I felt like an early Christian going to the gladiator arena in Roman times and catching their first fleeting glimpse of the fate that awaited. Bales of hay and picket blankets scattered around ready for the throng of foodies to taste away at what South Australia had to offer; it had quite a carnival feel.

This was the first time that there was to be an aged care food session at a celebrity chef driven food festival. There were some serious heavy weight food gladiators presenting at the week-long event.

One of my ultimate food heroes was there, namely Fergus Henderson along with Skye Gyngall from the UK, plus many more from France and around Australia along with past winners of Master Chef. I spent most of the Monday sourcing products from the great Adelaide markets and preparing for my aged care session on the Tuesday.

The chef on the arena on the Monday offered tastings of pig’s blood macaroons and other strange blood infused dessert offerings. (The macaroons actually tasted quite nice).

Meeting with Maggie

Participants of the think tank on food in aged care.

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It was Monday afternoon and as all my prep was ready for Tuesday, I rushed off to a meeting with Maggie Beer and a group of colleagues who are involved in an aged care food initiative across Australia, with the emphasis on wholesome, nutritious and fresh cooked food. This is a similar goal to what we strive for at HammondCare.

Maggie then announced at the meeting the launch for her foundation: “What I want to do is to find all the great exponents of aged care, so we can celebrate them with the acknowledgement they deserve from a food interested group; the Foundation.”

The Foundation launch was set to follow my presentation the next day, and so the job at hand suddenly became even greater with the thought of all the media packs waiting the next day. The pressure had just intensified!

The nervous chef

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I woke up the next morning at 3 am in a cold sweat, realising what I had to do in eight hours time. I couldn’t sleep so I walked around the city for an hour or two practicing in my head my presentation.

Colleague Peter Hallett met me at the hotel reception and we headed to ABC Radio Adelaide where I gave an interview which lasted about 13 minutes. It was a great discussion on food, innovation and dementia, plus included a little plug for our new cookbook.

It was 10 am and I finally checked all my ingredients for the presentation at 1pm, but then was I was needed on stage. The time had come to face the gladiators!

I walked out before a packed audience and took my seat next to Maggie, Simon Bryant and three other industry experts for the aged care panel discussion. Behind us were six nervous Adelaide aged care chefs preparing a mystery box lunch challenge with a food cost of $4.30 per meal.

The Industry panel discussion highlighted nutrition, food delivery and food costs. I discussed the importance of a wonderful dining experience for residents and championed our model of care in our cottages, hospitals and at-home care at HammondCare. I also mentioned our dementia specific care and how our fresh cook policy acts as a mealtime prompt, with wonderful smells wafting through the cottages.

Then the judging started and all the panel, including myself, tasted all the aged care chefs’ chicken mystery box dishes. They were all declared amazing!

Demonstrating food innovation

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Peter’s food demonstration.Peter being interviewed by Maggie on his work on food in aged care at HammondCare.

Then the moment of truth finally arrived and I stood in front of the crowd prepared to start my hour-long cooking presentation. I highlighted four recipes from the new cookery book which showed new ways of modifying meals and drinks using gels and molds. I made salmon, peas and carrots with creamed potato which was a smooth puree, all using molds.

Then I made a watermelon, lime and mint foam, suitable for all diets and fluid thicknesses. I made a fresh fruit salad (using moulds and agar-agar) to reform fruit bought from markets that day – papaya, apricots, watermelon and pear.

 

I also demonstrated ideas for people on peg feeds, including fresh raspberry juice air, which moistens the mouth and creates basal stimulation for patients who otherwise cannot be given food orally. It was the highlight of a long year trialing new ways to improve the visual presentation of modified food. These recipes will also slowly roll out into all our facilities and cottages now the recipes have been tested and written. Very exciting!

I finished my cooking demo and then Maggie Beer stood up to announce the exciting news of her new aged care food foundation. The media clambered over the stage to speak with her after her announcement. I retired happy and exhausted.

Future of food ‘fight’

The next morning the head of Tasting Australia rang to say they needed me to be a member on a panel for the food summit titled “The future direction of foods.” I sat up on stage like a reindeer caught in the headlights, sitting next to two very proud CEO’s of large-production food solution companies. At the far other end was a lovely fellow called Rodney Dunn from Tasmania’s Agrarian kitchen (farm food highlighting the emphasis on good food from paddock to plate). We were like two slices of organic bread next to large pieces of processed meat.

Suffice to say the conversation amongst the four panelists became quite heated. The two pieces of organic bread received applause from the crowd as we challenged the alternative food vision which seemed to me like a barren food dystopia of frozen meals, no kitchens and budgets for aged care and hospitals of $2.60 per resident a day.

After receiving some well-needed counselling and like-minded positive support after this baptism of fire, the next two days were spent meeting suppliers who were produce-driven. I discovered high protein Lupin flour which has great potential in aged care and hospital diets. I also talked lentils, legumes and olive oil to suppliers from SA.

For some light relief, I managed also to DJ on the Thursday and Friday evening at a Tasting Australia featured event, “chefs on decks.”

HammondCare features in Origins dinner

On Friday I was back to preparing food, helping Fergus Henderson simmer his pigs trotters and also get my HammondCare showcase dish ready for the Origin’s dinner alongside all the hall of fame of culinary and restaurant heavyweights. It was this time I felt very proud that HammondCare and myself were supported to cook alongside all these celebrity chefs. The HammondCare dish I cooked was Barossa Farm Chicken Bang Bang.

It was well received and Stephanie Alexander commented how refreshing and tasty it was. I sold out in record time plating over 120 tasting plates. The other 29 chefs also produced 100 dishes each (3000 dishes in 3 hours to 300 lucky people).

The night was a great success and the chefs managed to have a serious wind down after all the punters were dutifully fed. (Any excuse for a chef to celebrate!) It was midnight as I snuck back to the safety of my hotel room, leaving the other chefs to party until the small hours of the morning.

The trip was very rewarding for me but also a great showcase for HammondCare’s upcoming cookery book.

It was invaluable exercise to spread the word on what HammondCare does really well and also I felt very proud talking about our wonderful carers who cook every day in our cottages and our larger kitchens where staff tirelessly provide wholesome meals for all our dear residents.

– Peter Morgan-Jones

Adelaide think Tank on aged care food

Adelaide think Tank on aged care food

Peter Morgan-Jones

Inspired blog of food book author and leading aged Care chef working for HammondCare

Dementia UK Gold Challenge

Challenging ourselves in Olympic and Paralympic sports, to raise funds to support Dementia UK in improving quality of life for all people affected by dementia

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breath ~ speak ~ breath